Thursday, August 29, 2013

Corn Cob Stock

We just got back last night from a ten day trip to Oregon, and after lots of eating out, I am ready to cook. I've got some granola baking in the oven now and I'm heading to the Belmont farmers market shortly. I've started to make corn chowder a bit of an end of summer tradition over the last few years and I figure I may as well continue it. The last time I made it, I got the idea somewhere to make the broth from corn cobs. I thought this made a difference and would like to try it again. I have taken a couple of cooking classes with Helen Rennie (This is her: http://www.beyondsalmon.com/). In the last class I took with her, we made a baked risotto, and one thing
that was imprinted into my cooking mind forever was: DON'T USED BOXED BROTH. I'm not sure if she meant this just in the context of risotto, but I doubt it and am taking her message to heart. She said for risotto, you're better off using water than boxed broth. The flavor results will be better. This isn't to say I will never used boxed veggie broth again, but I will consider my alternatives for sure.
There are, of course, different variations of corn cob stock recipes out there, but I used the most basic last time (corn cobs and water) and will do the same this time.

The recipe I use for the chowder calls for 6 ears of corn and 6 cups of stock, so I'll make the broth based on that. If I were making broth just to have on hand, I may make the ratios a little different.

Corn Cob Broth
6 ears of corn
water

1.  Shuck the corn, slice all the kernels off the cobs and set the kernels aside.
2.  In a large stockpot, cover the cobs with water (break the cobs in half if you have to in order to fit them) and bring to a boil.
3. Once at a boil, reduce heat to low, and simmer covered for about 45 minutes to an hour, until the broth has a nice "corny" flavor.
4. Remove cobs and discard. If you want a more concentrated broth, you could continue to simmer the broth without the cobs.